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Thread: The Beer Thread

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by teknohed View Post
    Currently my favorite beer is a Belgian beer called Gouden Carolus Cuvee Van de Keizer My wife and I like it so much, we *ahem* borrowed the glassware from a local gastro pub that has it on Tap:
    OMG! Beer porn! LOL

    Keep em coming.

  2. #12
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    If I want a slightly heavier beer, I like Dogfish Head. Also, in the mix, Yuengling, Blue Moon, Some Dead Guy (and yes, that's it's name, and actually, on the first glass it tasted just like I would imagine some dead guy would taste, but it grew on me) and, believe it or not, Ballentine, either Beer or Ale, if you can find it. I had it special ordered for me at my local distributer in the Burg. Haven't tried to find it yet here in vegas. But mainly, it's either Millie Late' (Miller Lite for you commoners), Coors Light or MGD 64...depending on my weight...lol
    Nobody does anything they do not Choose to do.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheAlien View Post
    But mainly, it's either Millie Late' (Miller Lite for you commoners), Coors Light or MGD 64...depending on my weight...lol
    Miller High Life FTW.

  4. #14
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    So here is my big plug for brewing your own. You might not believe me but you are capable of brewing the $12 a six pack grade beer on your first attempt with just over $100 in equipment. And for about a $200 investment in equipment you can brew contest grade or $10 a bottle beer. Anything past $200 is just for flash or supporting volume, attention to detail is the real factor. The average cost for two cases in terms of ingredients varies from $20 to $40. I would say the average is $30-35. If you do the math it is much cheaper but it really isn't just about the money, it is about doing it with your own hands and producing a superior beer. Let me be very clear that we are not talking about the one step beer kits sold at hardware and discount stores, just don't do that.

    There are 4 basic steps to making beer, and one of them can be eliminated for beginners and really up to a very high level. You can do very high quality 3 step beer and cut down on your workload, equipment, and space requirements. The first step is to create the fermentable "syrup" from the grains. This process is done by heating the grains in water for a period of time, at a given temp, so that the enzymes convert do their work and produce a molasses like liquid. Here is where the shortcut comes in, most companies offer kits where this step is already done and the adjunct comes to you in bags or cans ready to use. There are low end products where they add the hopps and tell you it is ready to ferment, but most of them are as good or better than you can make yourself. The reason to move away from prepared adjunct is that you want a custom grain blend for your own recipe. So lets consider starting at a 3 step process and you can make your own adjunct later on if needed.

    Most home brew starts with either a kit or a recipe of your own that you order the components for. The only difference is that the kit comes with the recipe and ingredients in one box, the recipe is you ordering those same items tailored to your ideas. The kits are quite good and you can make great beer with them, then you modify the kits, and then once you have a dozen batches under your belt and it is old hat you start making your own up. Lets define a kit Vs the gear. The gear is the tanks, measuring devices, spoons etc, and the kit is the consumable ingredients. Many companies sell an equipment package either with or without your first ingredient kit. So here are the 3 steps in the process.

    1. The boil. This step is a matter of attention to detail and timing. In most cases you will begin the boil for a 5 gallon batch by boiling the water (use good quality water) and adding in the adjunct. 10 min in you add your hopps for flavoring, and 10 min before the end you add the hopps that create the aromatic hopps. After the boil the key is to cool it as fast as possible so that the proteins and sediments fall out the the mixture. Cheap and easy is to set the pot in the sink and run cold water/ice. That gets it done in an hour, better is to make a chiller with a coil of copper tube that circulates water from the tap, 15 min. Keep the mixture covered and don't get curious.

    2. Pitching and fermenting. Right now you have a perfect mixture for bacteria to grow in and you have a choice, it can be the yeast that makes happy beer or that festering stink hole that is your mouth. Don't breath on the mixture, keep it safe. You then pour the mixture into the fermentor and make sure the temp is right and then add the yeast so that the yeast starts to breed and becomes dominant. You then snap the lid on (I like to add CO2 to prevent air from contaminating) and set up the airlock that lets fermentation gasses out and prevents outside air from coming in. For about two weeks you let this ferment. You can do it by time or by measurement. Time is pretty good, measuring specific gravity to determine how much sugar has been turned into alcohol is best (most kits have that test equipment). Once you finish fermenting it is ready to bottle.

    3. Bottling. Your fermented mixture is now ready to be bottled. You transfer the mixture from the fermentor to the bottling tank which has a hose and valve to fill the bottles with. At this point the yeast has gone dormant after using all the sugar. What you then do is mix in a quantity of sugar that brings the yeast back to life. You then fill the bottles and cap them with a capping tool which comes in the equipment kit. Caps come in the ingredient kits. Over the next two weeks the sugar is consumed and the CO2 is trapped and carbonates the beer in the bottle. Depending on the recipe you might want to wait 3 weeks or 6 weeks before peak flavor is reached.

    Upgrades. The single biggest thing you can do in my opinion is dual stage fermentation. The first week of fermentation throws off a ton of sediment and proteins. If you let it got the first week and then transfer it off the sediment and let it continue fermenting the beer will be much cleaner and pure in flavor.

    If you want to look at some good kits, check out these below. There are other great companies but I had to pick somewhere to start.

    Lets get the Cadillac kit out of the way, http://www.williamsbrewing.com/COMPL..._P2338C257.cfm

    The basic kit with an ingredient kit, http://www.williamsbrewing.com/BREWE...E_P2192C73.cfm

    The gear with no ingredient kit, you can pick your own. http://www.williamsbrewing.com/HOME_...IT_P680C73.cfm

    Let me just say that the book and DVD that come with the Williams kit can turn a clueless beginner into a competent brewer.
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  5. #15
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    Holy crap Scott, amazing post. Is there any subject that you are not intricately familiar with? I think a nice batch of "Space War Stout", "Pac Man Pale Ale", "Robotron Red", or "Lunar Lander Lager" is in order for next years CGE.


  6. #16
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    I'm a beer snob as well. I tend to favor Belgian style wheat's and darker ales , as a matter of preference. Blue moon and Pyramid are both great beers, for the price. I also swear by smithwicks and paddingtons for my darks. Being in indianapolis, beer is a subject of much debate out here, and its no surprise that microbreweries are everywhere. I've been offered a tour of the many drinking facilities out here, and coming up this spring I intend to take them. I'll let you all know how they go down.
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  7. #17
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    • Holy crap Scott, amazing post. Is there any subject that you are not intricately familiar with?

    Here is an extensive list with no fewer than 200 items, more are available upon request from me or my wife.

    THE LIST
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  8. #18
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    This Men's Health post is an obnoxious 40 page "slide show" that makes you click through the beers one at a time, but it is interesting. Looks like The Alien is right, MGD64 is the lowest calorie, but also the lowest alchahol content. If you really are watching your caloric intake, it looks like Amstel Light or Miller Lite are your best bets.

  9. #19
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    RGR will soon be including a Cross Stitch segment hosted by Scott if that's any help.
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  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by SubaruBrat View Post

    Here is an extensive list with no fewer than 200 items, more are available upon request from me or my wife.

    THE LIST
    Out of that lot I think Faceball is the winner.

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