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miner2049er
30-04-14, 08:51
Well, SoCal made it, but not all the audio did.

We missed a bit of Live News, but still, fun was had by all.

TOPICS COVERED IN THE SHOW
Hardware Flashback - (00:00)
It Came From MAME - (35:13)
Guinness Gaming Records - (43:06)
Leonard Herman Interview - (45:08)
The Great And Powerful Oz - (78:37)
Top Ten Console Space Shooters - (79:07)
Gaming Trivia - (166:53)
Marcel Donne: Wizball High Score - (:)
Live News And Listener Views - (169:16)
URLs And EMails - (205:16)

See the shownotes page (http://www.retrogamingroundup.com/shownotes/2014/roundup073_2014.04.php). Donate (http://www.retrogamingroundup.com/donate.php) to the show.

Join our Facebook Group (<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/RetroGamingRoundup/121368478521). Podcatch via the show’s RSS Feed (http://retrogamingroundup.libsyn.com/rss).

Read the Live News chat log (http://www.retrogamingroundup.com/shownotes/2014/roundup073_chat.php).

Stream the show 24/7 (http://www.retrogamingroundup.com/247).

TV's Mr. Neil
30-04-14, 09:11
ARRRGGHHH!! I was so looking forward to you guys laughing at my resume. I can't believe the audio is lost. Man, I'm bummed I missed it.

Burgertime
01-05-14, 02:23
I guess some of us will need to start recording extra backups of the live news more often in case this happens again. Things have been pretty hectic with you guys considering you're running CGE, and you've recently done a move.

drich255
02-05-14, 06:15
Another great episode guys! Nice top 10 too! When you get a chance, can you set up the top 10 page so we can vote for our picks and continue the debate? Thanks!

TV's Mr. Neil
08-05-14, 05:56
I guess some of us will need to start recording extra backups of the live news more often in case this happens again.

Yeah, please do that. I was even thinking of doing that myself just in case something like this happened, but I couldn't make it to the live news that day. Bummer!

SubaruBrat
08-05-14, 10:41
Laugh, what laugh, we hired you on the spot!

Chris++
23-05-14, 10:30
Okay, here's an attempt to get these awesome forums fired back up with a bit of friendly provocation. Nonetheless, it's my genuine opinion: I'm always surprised when Star Fox, on any platform, is championed. To me, it's just another "wallpaper shoot-'em-up," which is what I call games in which the player has no control over the direction of the scroll. I suppose that these are often referred to as "on-the-rails shooters," given the roller-coaster nature of the environment's forced scrolling.

For instance, if we consider side-scrolling games, I enjoy things like Defender, Stargate, etc., in which the player can control his direction and speed, and even stop and hover if he wants to, much more than games like Scramble and R-Type. In the case of something like Star Fox, it's not much different to me from Space Harrier. It's just another target-shooting game. It might as well be a fancy shooting gallery.

I tend to look at the essence of the game play and whether or not something is genuinely fun, rather than focusing on the graphical trappings. I started playing on the Atari VCS in 1982, so that might have something to do with it. The player used his imagination to complete each game, in a way, because he was faced with those beautifully abstract graphics (Adventure, Yars' Revenge, etc.). So I'm always focused on the game play above all, and whether or not a game feels good to play, rather than the extra-gamical aspects.

The Atari Jaguar game Cybermorph was often compared with Star Fox -- erroneously. Cybermorph is a hell of a lot better -- in fact, it's probably my favorite Jaguar game. It's a completely different game paradigm than Star Fox. The comparison always confused me. Cybermorph is something like Doom in a spaceship. You can stop, turn around, and fly in any direction on each planet, and you have a great deal of freedom on every amazing spherical world that they came up with. You explore for things, unlike in Star Fox -- and if you leave a pod, intact building, enemy, etc. where it is, and then fly back to that spot later, it's still there. It's all a consistent, real-space world, rather than a forced-scrolling windshield shooter.

The Jaguar controller is among the best I've ever used, but then, I have big hands. It's that tiny NES controller that set a trend into motion that I've never liked. When joysticks were sadly replaced with button controllers, it became very difficult to move diagonally in any game. The Jaguar controller made it much easier with its directional pad, and the whole thing's just extremely comfortable to me. For nearly everything else, I use emulators and have a Stelladapter, so that I can use the original 2600 joystick whenever possible.

And regarding an old complaint about Cybermorph, you can turn off the bald chick's voice. It's extremely easy. Sure, once in a while, you get a green, bald Sinead O'Connor type appearing in the upper-left corner, but you don't notice, when you've muted her. She becomes the perfect woman: seen and not heard. Well, and green. But never mind.

(Extra-gamical?)

.

drich255
24-05-14, 03:07
Okay, here's an attempt to get these awesome forums fired back up with a bit of friendly provocation...I'm always surprised when Star Fox, on any platform, is championed...

The forums have seemed less active. I was chalking it up to summer activities.

I am not the best person to defend Star Fox, since I never owned any of them until the 3DS re-release. I did play it a little bit with friends. With four controllers available, the original Star Fox 64 had a fun battle mode. Of course other N64 games offered 4 player competition like Golden Eye and Mario Kart, but flying around and shooting your friends in a dog fight was a fun experience.

And I do like on-rail shooters and shooting galleries, but that is more a personal preference (and nostalgia for Duck Hunt).

I am not really itching for more Star Fox, but I would love for the Wii U to come out with another Rogue Squadron game (which is somewhere in between free-explore and on-rails).

focusrs
24-05-14, 12:49
Oh ya!, A good Rogue Squadron on the Wii would actually tempt me in buying the little critter :). As for Chris's comments on Starfox and Cybermorph, I like them both (especially with that bald chick muted:) ). But as Chris says, Cybermorph gives you more freedom and generally is a good game if given the chance.

Chris++
24-05-14, 10:42
I did play it a little bit with friends. With four controllers available, the original Star Fox 64 had a fun battle mode. Of course other N64 games offered 4 player competition like Golden Eye and Mario Kart, but flying around and shooting your friends in a dog fight was a fun experience.

You know, I didn't even take that into account -- I suppose that Star Fox 64 was the game to fire up if you wanted good multi-player action, rather than anything on the dear old Jag. Good point.



...(and nostalgia for Duck Hunt).

Definitely a shared nostalgia here. :)

SubaruBrat
25-05-14, 01:00
Like I said on the show, what I liked is that for once Nintendo used a hardware platform as intended. So many times they never implement features or only do so initially, be it optional hardware (R.O.B.) or hardware built into every unit sold (AR for 3DS). The idea of the SNES from the factory was that components got cheaper all the time, and by the time that a certain video or sound IC was needed that the price would be lower, and they would have freedom to select from anything out there rather than being locked into what was shipped. That is one of my main arguments for returning to cartridge media, that way many games could use cheap flash memory in an otherwise nearly empty cart (and the carts could be updated as fixes and new content are released), and for special games additional hardware could be included. Yes it would screw with the whole product lifecycle and of course studios would probably not take up the challenge of releasing new and novel interfaces or features on the carts, but what if?

cross_bearer_02
25-05-14, 03:58
That is one of my main arguments for returning to cartridge media, that way many games could use cheap flash memory in an otherwise nearly empty cart (and the carts could be updated as fixes and new content are released), and for special games additional hardware could be included. Yes it would screw with the whole product lifecycle and of course studios would probably not take up the challenge of releasing new and novel interfaces or features on the carts, but what if?

I love this idea! In fact, I argued this same thing years ago when the original Nintendo DS came out. The amount of storage on the DS cards was adequate enough to facilitate fairly large games with decent loading times. And then as transfer speeds and capacities for flash media have grown since then, I still wonder why more companies don't embrace this for their home consoles.

Of course, both the Nintendo 3DS and the Playstation Vita use forms of flash media for their game data storage as well. So it's not like there's a technical impediment. But if I were to wager a guess, I would say it's likely an issue with game companies really wanting users to step away from physical media and embrace digital-only downloads. So my guess is these companies figure if they keep the physical media as optical discs with large load times, and set that side-by-side with digital downloads that load much much quicker, they can convince the buying public that digital downloads are the way to go.

Once that happens, and people begin asking for digital downloads almost exclusively over physical media, the rest then, as they say, would be history.

drich255
25-05-14, 03:36
Mike, Scott, and Mike -- the top 10 thread for last month still isn't up. Not too late for us to vote and weigh in on our favorite console space shooters! Thanks!

random_dave
26-05-14, 09:57
I love this idea! In fact, I argued this same thing years ago when the original Nintendo DS came out. The amount of storage on the DS cards was adequate enough to facilitate fairly large games with decent loading times. And then as transfer speeds and capacities for flash media have grown since then, I still wonder why more companies don't embrace this for their home consoles.

Of course, both the Nintendo 3DS and the Playstation Vita use forms of flash media for their game data storage as well. So it's not like there's a technical impediment. But if I were to wager a guess, I would say it's likely an issue with game companies really wanting users to step away from physical media and embrace digital-only downloads. So my guess is these companies figure if they keep the physical media as optical discs with large load times, and set that side-by-side with digital downloads that load much much quicker, they can convince the buying public that digital downloads are the way to go.

Once that happens, and people begin asking for digital downloads almost exclusively over physical media, the rest then, as they say, would be history.

There is also the reason that a lot of games need to sell well beyond a million copies to break even now, and mastered optical media is still cheaper to manufacture than flash media, and $.02 on every copy, when you want to order 5million copies makes enough of a difference for the bean counters to choose that method.

In fact, with the latest generation finally wasting nearly an entire dual layer blu-ray (I say wasting due to a few of them seeming to move towards uncompressed audio and textures, which could use even a slight bit of lossless compression at minimal performance impact, but hey, why do that when you can say "this is the biggest call of duty yet, it's 40gb) but, back to the point, the difference between stamping 40gb on a blu-ray and a 40gb high speed ROM must be quite a bit I'd imagine.

And I think (the first) starfox is actually one of my favourite games of all time, I will totally agree on the comments regarding freedom etc, but it's that focus that appeals to me. It allows predictable runs, that are perfect for practicing to attain the 100% rating on every level and do a perfect run, or just kick back when feeling ill, or after a tonne of booze and almost autopilot through a familiar environment blasting away the evil Andross Empire.
It's basically my gaming equivalent of comfort food

Chris++
28-05-14, 12:30
It's basically my gaming equivalent of comfort food

:D I can dig it.



That is one of my main arguments for returning to cartridge media, that way many games could use cheap flash memory in an otherwise nearly empty cart (and the carts could be updated as fixes and new content are released), and for special games additional hardware could be included.

I completely agree; with the possibilities these days, it would be like adding another mini-console with each new cartridge, which could take advantage of any technical developments that have occurred since the console's launch -- or the release of the last cart, for that matter.



Once that happens, and people begin asking for digital downloads almost exclusively over physical media, the rest then, as they say, would be history.

You've hit the nail on the head there. It would only work if customers participated, as with any product. Folks often forget that they vote with their wallets. Buying something is sending a message to the company that made it: "Yes, I'll take this lower quality, and as you can see, I'll even pay the exorbitant price! In fact, raise the price yet again! As you can see, many of us will still buy it. Baaaaa." And corporations pay very close attention to these messages. It's been the case with gasoline, food and of course many other things, including software.

Without financial encouragement from consumers, any successful businessman drops an idea like a hotcake, usually based on just a single fiscal quarter. Unfortunately, people often tend to be lazy and play along, spending their cash rather than making little changes to their lives in order to send a "NO!" to any company -- and then they complain that too few people are wealthy. Well...stop givin' 'em your money!

I might seem to have wandered a bit off the topic, but it's definitely a facet of the game industry. Our hobby has survived a few setbacks over the years to finally become big, big business, and any new step forward (or backward) requires the participation of many. Nothing can be force-fed to a consumer. His choice is between willingly stuffing it down, or simply going without.

miner2049er
29-05-14, 07:49
Mike, Scott, and Mike -- the top 10 thread for last month still isn't up. Not too late for us to vote and weigh in on our favorite console space shooters! Thanks!

Oh yeah, that would be SoCal's job each month.

Here it is http://www.gamegavel.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7268