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SubaruBrat
14-10-09, 01:20
This topic came up a few times recently. The other day I was sitting talking with two friends, one a fellow collector and one who loves the games but just won't commit to ownership. For me, back in the golden era of arcades I wanted nothing more than to own one, and that has never faded. I sometimes find myself acting as a salesman for the hobby. I encourage people to pick up machines. It doesn't benefit me directly, if anything it increases the pool of collectors and competition. But I want to share with others in this hobby. I have yet to convince someone to make the plunge and have them come back later and say they regret it, I always hear how great it is.

So, I pose this question for the listenership. If you have not taken the plunge to own a video game or pinball or other coin op, what is preventing you? If you are now a collector who broke through the barrier of jumping in what held you off and what pushed you in?

Chris
14-10-09, 01:51
It's a few things....

1. Cost: Alot of them cost quite a bit of money brand new. I think I'd want a pinball machine, and I think it's hard to find a good one in good condition for less than a few hundred.

2. Space: I could put it in my basement after I get rid of the Brunswick Pool Table I'm trying to sell (hint hint)

3. Maintenance: I'm no maintenance wiz. I need LOW maintenance. As I understand it, pinball machines are not low maintenance. Something goes wrong and I'm probably SOL for the most part.

GameGavel
14-10-09, 02:00
Hey Chris,

I am also not a wiz at fixing anything. So arcade games and pinball machines are a bit scary to some point. Luckily, I have had great luck with my pins. I've had my Taxi for a couple years now and not a single hiccup. My games are usually all bought working and most continue to work. I've had very few issues with a game going down. I have learned how to take care of the simple things like fuse replacment, board cleaning, joystick/leafswitch tweaking, etc. Those three things there seem to tackle most of the problems I've come across.

As for pricing, Craigslist is littered with good deals if you keep your eyes open. And games now are cheaper than they have ever been. You should be able to find a dedicated classic for around $200 no problem if you look frequently.

And if something does break on it, there is a good collector crowd all over the country that can offer help to fix it.

SubaruBrat
14-10-09, 02:10
Bingo, and your in my trap (respectfuly).

No really, I just want to counter the objections with information. What I have found is that there are many secrets in this hobby that people do not know.

So;

#1 Cost. Well that depends. I have said many times that collecting is a waiting game. I have bought some great games for well under $500. In fact, the best EM I ever got was for $100. What do you need to do. Set a price limit that you will spend and have the cash ready. Establish and monitor your sources, Ebay, Craigslist, local auctions, and most of all, the Pinball newsgroup (http://groups.google.com/group/rec.games.pinball/topics?hl=en&lnk).

Check the sources and when the game comes along, jump right away.


#2 Space. I hear this allot. I have a friend who has a 5 bedroom house with one kid and his wife cries poverty on space. He has a closet that must remain closed lest someone see the game he has. What a way to live.... If I had space for one game, and it really is not much space, I would build a sweet MAME machine and have a blast.

#3 Maintenance. Who told you that KABOOM!KABOOM!KABOOM!KABOOM!. First off, think of it this way, you are told that your car is complex with computers and what not. Are you not capable of learning what your local mechanic knows? I love working on pins as much as I love playing them but ultimately once sorted out the maintenance is minimal. Once a pin is brought up to full working order you are dealing with a machine made to work all day in a commercial environment now being used lightly in an ideal environment. I can tell you that most of my machines have needed nothing but a mild cleaning and the occasional failure is rare. I have a 50 plus machine collection and keeping my skills sharp is tough at times. Just get one, and by the time you have it in tune it is likely to stay that way.

Chris
14-10-09, 01:00
#3 Maintenance. Who told you that KABOOM!KABOOM!KABOOM!KABOOM!. First off, think of it this way, you are told that your car is complex with computers and what not. Are you not capable of learning what your local mechanic knows? I love working on pins as much as I love playing them but ultimately once sorted out the maintenance is minimal. Once a pin is brought up to full working order you are dealing with a machine made to work all day in a commercial environment now being used lightly in an ideal environment. I can tell you that most of my machines have needed nothing but a mild cleaning and the occasional failure is rare. I have a 50 plus machine collection and keeping my skills sharp is tough at times. Just get one, and by the time you have it in tune it is likely to stay that way.

Haha, you're going to laugh but I actually got the impression that pinball tables were alot of work only after I had heard you talk about maintenance on the Hardware Flashback. I think you were talking about a board going bad or a power supply issue or something, but it just struck me like "wow, I never knew so much could go wrong with a pinball machine!"

How much do they weigh usually?

SubaruBrat
14-10-09, 02:20
150~250. They are an easy two man carry. One person can move an assembled one around easily.

CinemaslaveJoe
19-10-09, 04:09
As I mentioned in my introductory message, I've owned a few machines over the years. My first was a Donkey Kong Jr., which I bought for $100. I later bought a Donkey Kong logic board, and could swap the boards in and out in a couple of minutes. I also bought a Star Wars KABOOM!KABOOM!KABOOM!KABOOM!pit, but the vector monitor died a few months later, and I sold it. I'm still kicking myself! Also owned a beautiful Dragon's Lair arcade game, along with a Space Ace laserdisc/logic board, which were easily switched.

There were a few other machines along the way, but these were my favorites. I miss them all. Mame and Daphne are nice, but it's not quite the same on the computer keyboard.

-CSJ